History Of James Larking With Focus On Achievements

Pursuing the rights of workers was a role that James Larkin adhered to diligently. He worked closely with the people to understand what they felt about the labor laws used on them. James Larkin was born in a family that dwelled in the slums of Liverpool and his parents worked at the dock, where they were paid too little to sustain the needs of the family. Learn more about Jim Larkin: https://www.biography.com/people/james-larkin-215214

When he reached his youth, he developed interest in the politics around workers pay and rights. He also started working at the Liverpool docks and as a committed socialist, he believed the way workers were treated was not justified.

He started looking for ways to help in the fight against unfair policies and practices, so he joined the Union of Dock Laborers where he was appointed to serve on a full-time basis as an organizer. This gave him a chance to closely monitor the activities of employers and to invite other workers to the negotiating table to plan a way forward that would see them get fairness.

At the time he served at NUDL, the union thought he applied strike methods that were militant, so it moved him to Dublin in 1907. Upon arriving at Dublin, Jim Larkin established a new union, the Irish Transport and General Workers Union, whose goal was to consolidate the support of all industrial workers so as to make the war against unfair labor practices stronger. After the success of this union, he created another, the Irish Labor Party, which took part in leading several strikes.

It is through this union that Jim Larkin led the 1913 Dublin Lockout, a strike that was supported by more than 100,000 workers, who remained in strike for about eight months. Read more: James Larkin | Biography

Eventually, they won the right to fair employment, something that marked the biggest success in the life of Jim Larkin. This success further energized him to continue with his pursuit for justice among workers, and many more joined him in the quest for fair labor policies.

When the First World War started, Jim Larkin was concerned in the way destruction was happening, so he decided to chip in. To raise money needed to stop the British, he embarked on a journey to the U.S. Later, the government convicted him citing criminal anarchy and communism as grounds for the decision. When he was pardoned three years later, they deported him back to Ireland.